Notable Literary Deaths (May 2012)

Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times

Maurice Sendak (1928-2012) died on May 8th at the age of 83. He was widely considered one of the most important children’s book authors/illustrators of the 20th century.  He was best known for 1964 Caldecott Medal-winning Where the Wild Things Are (PZ7 .S47 Wh).  He illustrated the following Caldecott Honor Books, 1963′s Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present (PZ7 .Z77 Mi), 1962′s Little Bear’s Visit, 1960′s The Moon Jumpers (PZ7 .U27 Mo) (written by MacMurray alum Janice May Udry), 1959′s What Do You Say, Dear?, and 1954′s A Very Special House.  He also wrote two Honor books; 1982′s Outside Over There (PZ7 .S47 Ou), for which he also won the National Book Award for Picture Books, and 1971′s In the Night Kitchen (PZ7 .S47 In).  He was also awarded the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for having “made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children.”  The Library also owns the following books written and/or illustrated by Sendak:

The Animal Family, illustrator (PZ7 .J295 An)

Hector Protector, and As I Went Over the Water:  Two Nursery Rhymes with Pictures, author and illustrator (PZ8.3 .S4684 He)

Higglety Pigglety Pop!  Or, There Must be More to Life, author and illustrator (PZ10.3 .S356 Hi)

The Hundred Penny Box, illustrator (Pz7 .M4284 Hu)

Let’s Be Enemies, illustrator (PZ7 .U27 Let 1988)

Little Bear, illustrator (Pz7 .M652 Li)

Lullabies and Night Songs, illustrator (M1997 .W6843 L8)

His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Henry Romero/Reuters

Carlos Fuentes (1928-2012) died on May 15th at the age of 83.  He was an acclaimed Mexican novelist and essayist, often associated with the Latin American Boom literary movement of the 1960s and 1970s when young Latin American writers such as Fuentes, Julio Cortazar, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez began gaining recognition throughout the world.  Though he never won the award, he was frequently discussed as a possible candidate for the Nobel Prize for Literature.  Among the awards he did win during his more than fifty year career were the 1987 Miguel de Cervantes Prize, an annual award honoring the lifetime achievement of an outstanding writer in the Spanish language, and the 1999 Belisario Dominguez Medal of Honor, the highest award bestowed by the Mexican government.  The Library owns a number of his works, both in English and in Spanish:

Aura, Spanish ed. (PQ7297 .F793 A85 1975)

Las Buenas Conciencias, Spanish ed. (PQ7297 .F793 B8 1973)

Cantar de Ciegos, Spanish ed. (PQ7297 .F793 C3 1974)

Cumpleanos, Spanish ed. (PQ7297 .F793 C8 1976)

Distant Relations, English ed. (PQ7297 .F793 F313 1982)

Gringo Viejo, Spanish ed. (PQ7297 .F793 G7 1985)

La Muerte de Artemis Cruz, Spanish ed. (PQ7297 .F793 M8 1973x)

La Nueva Novela Hispanoamericana, Spanish ed. (PQ7082 .N7 F8 1972)

La Region Mas Transparente, Spanish ed. (PQ7297 .F793 R4 1973)

Terra Nostra, English ed. (PQ7297 .F84 T313 1983)

Where the Air is Clear, English ed. (PQ7297 .F793 W5 1990)

Zona Sagrada, Spanish ed. (PQ7297 .F793 Z6 1973)

His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Jean Craighead George (1919-2012) died on May 15th at the age of 92.  She was an award-winning American author of young adult books, best known for her 1973 Newberry Medal-winning Julie of the Wolves (PZ7 .G2933 Ju) and the 1960 Newberry Honor book My Side of the Mountain (PZ7 .G2933 My).  The Library also owns her books Arctic Son (PZ7 .G2933 Ar 1997), The Hole in the Tree (PZ7 .G2933), and Who Really Killed Cock Robin?  An Ecological Mystery (PZ7 .G2933 Wh).  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

Paul Fussell (1924-2012) died on May 23rd at the age of 88.  He was an American writer, historian, and literary critic, best known for The Great War and Modern Memory, winner of the 1975 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism and the 1976 National Book Award for Arts and Letters.  In 1998 the Modern Library Board listed it as the 75th best non-fiction book published since 1900.  The Library also owns Class:  a Guide through the American Status System (HN90 .S6 F87 1992) and The Rhetorical World of Augustan Humanism:  Ethics and Imagery from Swift to Burke (PR561 .F8).  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Williams Hanley (1931-2012) died on May 25th at the age of 80.  He was an award-winning playwright and television writer.  He broke onto the scene when his double-bill of Off Broadway one acts plays, Whisper into My Good Ear and Mrs. Dally Has a Lover, earned him a Drama Desk Award in 1963.  Both plays are included in Mrs. Dally Has a Lover:  and Other Plays (PS3558 .A17 M5).  Later in his career he earned Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, for a Dramatic Special for Something About Amelia in 1984 and The Attic:  The Hiding of Anne Frank in 1988.  His obituaries from Playbill.com and The New York Times can be found here and here, respectively.

Leo Dillon (1933-2012) died on May 27th at the age of 79.  He was an American illustrator of children’s books who, along with his wife Diane, are the only people to have won consecutive Caldecott Medals, and two or only nine to have won multiple Medals.  They won in 1976 for Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears by Verna Aardema (PZ8.1 .A213 Wh) and in 1977 for Ashanti to Zulu:  African Traditions by Margaret Musgrove (PZ5 GN645 .M87).  Among many other awards, the pair also won the 1971 Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist and in 1997 were inducted into the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame.  The Library also owns another book they illustrated, The Hundred Penny Box by Sharon Bell Mathis (PZ7 .M4284 Hu).  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

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Notable Literary Deaths (April 2012)

Reed Whittemore (1919-2012) died on April 6th at the age of 92.  He was an American  writer and poet who served both as the Poet Laureate of Maryland from 1985 to 1988 and twice as the United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry from 1964 to 1965 and again for an ailing Robert Fitzgerald from 1984 to 1985.  His collection The Mother’s Breast and the Father’s House was a finalist for the 1975 National Book Award.  Examples of his work can be found on the Poetry Foundation website.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Virginia Spencer Carr (1929-2012) died on April 10th at the age of 82.  She was an award-winning American writer, best-known for her three literary biographies, A Lonely Hunter:  a Biography of Carson McCullers (PS3525 .A1772 Z58), Dos Passos:  a Life, and Paul Bowles:  a Life.  Both A Lonely Hunter and Dos Passos were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize.  When it was first published in 1975, A Lonely Hunter marked the first book-length biography of McCullers, and it remains the standard account of her life to this day.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

Lewis Nordan (1939-2012) died on April 13th at the age of 72. He was an American short story writer and novelist, best-known for his award-winning novel Wolf Whistle.  The novel was based on the murder of black teenager Emmett Till in Money, MS, a town located close to Nordan’s hometown.  The book earned him the Southern Book Award.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Doris Betts (1932-2012) died on April 21st at the age of 79.  She was an award-winning short story writer and novelist in the Southern literary tradition.  Her 1973 short story collection Beasts of the Southern Wild and Other Stories was a finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction.  Her best-known work was the short story “The Ugliest Pilgrim” which was adapted into both an Academy Award-winning short film titled “Violet” and a New York Drama Critics Circle Award-winning Off Broadway musical.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

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Notable Literary Deaths (March 2012)

Paul S. Boyer (1935-2012) died on March 17th at the age of 76.  He was an American historian who first rose to prominence in 1975 with his groundbreaking Salem Possessed:  the Social Origins of Witchcraft (BF1576 .B6).  For the work, he and co-author Stephan Nissenbaum received a National Book Award nomination and won the 1974 John H. Dunning Prize.  He is probably best known for his two books dealing with the culture impact of the United States’ decision to drop atomic bombs, 1985′s By the Bomb’s Early Light:  American Thought and Culture at the Dawn of the Atomic Age and 1998′s Fallout.  The Library also owns Purity in Print:  the Vice-Society Movement and Book Censorship in America (KF4775 .B6) and Salem-Village Witchcraft:  a Documentary Record of Local Conflict in Colonial New England (BF1575 .B68).  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Christine Brooke-Rose (1923-2012) died on March 21st at the age of 89.  She was a British literary critic and writer of experimental fiction.  Among her best known novels was Such, for which she shared the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction in 1966.  The Library owns her study of the work of the poet Ezra Pound, A ZBC of Ezra Pound (PS3531 .O82 Z55 1971b).  Her New York Time obituary can be found here.

Irving Louis Horowitz (1929-2012) died on March 21st at the age of 82.  He was an American sociologist and writer.  In addition to authoring or editing numerous books and articles, he was the founder of the journal Transaction:  Social Science and Modern Society, which later changed its name to Society.  The Library owns several of his books:

Latin American Radicalism:  a Documentary Report on Left and Nationalist Movements, editor (F1414.2 .H65)

Radicalism and the Revolt Against Reason:  the Social Theories of Georges Sorel (HX263 .S6 H5 1961)

The Rise and Fall of Project Camelot:  Studies in the Relationship Between Science and Practical Politics (H62 .H62)

Sociology and Pragmatism:  the Higher Learning in America, editor (HM27 .M55 1966)

Three Worlds of Development:  the Theory and Practice of International Stratification (HD82 .H618)

His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Adrienne Rich (1929-2012) died on March 27th at the age of 82.  She was a widely-read, widely-anthologized American poet and essayist, and one of the most influential writers of the feminist movement.  She emerged on the literary scene when her debut collection of poems, A Change of World, was selected by W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award in 1951.   Throughout her career, she won many of the major awards and prizes in the field of poetry including the 1971 Shelley Memorial Award, the inaugural Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize in 1986, the 1992 Robert Frost Medal, and the 2003 Bollingen Prize for Poetry.  The Library owns many of her books, both poetry:

An Atlas of the Difficult World:  Poems 1988-1991 (PS3535 .I233 A84 1991) winner of the 1992 Poets’ Prize and the 1992 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize

Diving into the Wreck:  Poems, 1971-1972 (PS3535 .I233 D58) co-winner of the 1974 National Book Award for Poetry

The Dream of Common Language:  Poems, 1974-1977 (PS3535 .I233 D7 1978)

Poems:  Selected and New, 1950-1974 (PS3535 .I233 A17 1975)

Time’s Power:  Poems 1985-1988 (PS3535 .I233 T5 1989)

A Wild Patience Has Taken Me This Far:  Poems 1978-1981 (PS3535 .I233 W5 1993)

and prose:

Blood, Bread, and Poetry:  Selected Prose, 1979-1985 (PS3535 .I233 B6 1986)

Of Woman Born:  Motherhood as Experience and Institution (HQ759 .R53 1976)

On Lies, Secrets, and Silence:  Selected Prose, 1966-1978 (PS3535 .I233 O6 1995)

What is Found There:  Notebooks on Poetry and Politics (PS3535 .I233 W45 2003)

The Library also own a book of criticism about her poetry, Adrienne Rich’s Poetry:  Texts of the Poems:  the Poet on Her Work:  Reviews and Criticism (PS3535 .I233 A6 1975).  Biographies, interviews, and examples of her work can be found at poets.org, the Poetry Foundation, The Poetry Archive, and Modern American Poetry.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

John Arden (1930-2012) died on March 28th at the age of 81.  He was an English writer and experimental playwright who, though critically admired, never gained the popular acclaim of his contemporaries like John Osborne and Arnold Wesker.  His best known play is Serjeant Musgrave’s Dance (PR6001 .R44 S4 1962) for which he won the Charles Wintour Award for Most Promising Playwright in 1959.  He also won the Giles Cooper Award in 1982 for the radio drama The Old Man Sleeps Alone and had his novel Silence Among the Weapons shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1982.  The Library also owns Three Plays:  The Waters of Babylon, Live Like Pigs, The Happy Haven (PR6001 .R44 T4 1964) and The Workhouse Donkey (PR6051 .R3 W6 1967).  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Harry Crews (1935-2012) died on March 28th at the age of 76.  He was an American writer, best-known for his Southern Gothic novels.  His work, described in his New York Times obituary as “darkly comic, bitingly satirical, grotesquely populated and almost preternaturally violent” was praised by critics, but never acquired a large readership.  Among the small group of readers, he engendered a fiercely loyal following.  Examples of his work, criticism of his work, a bibliography, and links to numerous obituaries and remembrances can be found at The Harry Crews Online Bibliography.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

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Notable Literary Deaths (February 2012)

Wislawa Szymborska (1923-2012) died on February 1st at the age of 88.  She was a Polish poet who won the Nobel Prize in Literature.  While popular in her home country, she was little known outside of Poland and published a relatively small number of poems when she was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1996.  In addition to the Nobel Prize, she won several other prizes during her more than sixty year career including the 1991 Goethe Prize and the 1995 Herder Prize.  In addition, in 2011 she was awarded the Order of the White Eagle, Poland’s highest decoration.  Biographies and examples of her work can be found on the poets.org site and Poetry Foundation site.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

Dorothy Gilman (1923-2012) died on February 2nd at the age of 88.  She was a mystery writer, best known for her series of Mrs. Pollifax spy novels.  The series, starting with 1966′s The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax, followed the adventures of an elderly woman who, after becoming bored with her life in New Jersey, joins the CIA.  The series spanned 14 novels, ending with 2000′s Mrs. Pollifax Unveiled.  She published a number of other works, and in 2010 was awarded the Grand Master Award by the Mystery Writer’s of America.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

John Christopher (1922-2012) died on February 3rd at the age of 89.  John Christopher was the most well-known pseudonym of the British writer Sam Youd.  As John Christopher, he was best known for three science fiction trilogies aimed at young adults, The Tripods trilogy (1967-68) (later expanded to a tetralogy in 1988), the Sword of the Spirits trilogy (1970-72), and the Fireball trilogy (1981-86).  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Irene McKinney (1939-2012) died on February 4th at the age of 72.  She was a poet and from 1994 until her death served as the Poet Laureate of West Virginia.  A biography and examples of her work can be found on the Poetry Foundation’s website.

Anthony Shadid (1968-2012) died on February 16th at the age of 43.  He was a journalist, reporting for, at various times during his career, The Associated Press, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, and at the time of his death, The New York Times.  He won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 2004 and in 2010 for his coverage of the Iraq War for The Washington Post.  He died from an asthma attack while on assignment in Syria.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

William Gay (1941-2012) died on February 23rd at the age of 70.  He was a critically-acclaimed novelist and short story writer who, despite writing nearly all his life, didn’t have anything published until his late 50s.  Writing in a Southern Gothic tradition, and influenced by the likes of Flannery O’Connor and Cormac McCarthy, his first novel The Long Home won the 1999 James A. Michener Memorial Prize.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Jan Berenstain (1923-2012) dies on February 24th at the age of 88.  She and her husband Stan (1923-2005) were children’s authors best known for writing the Berenstain Bears series of books.  The series starting with 1962′s The Big Honey Hunt, and growing to over 300 titles, also spawned several television series, computer games, museum exhibits, and stage show.  The series featuring Papa Bear, Mama Bear, Brother Bear, and Sister Bear dealt with issues common to most families, from visits to the doctor to telling the truth.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

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Notable Literary Deaths (December 2011 & January 2012)

Christa Wolf (1929-2011) died on December 1st at the age of 82.  A novelist, essayist, and short story writer, she was one of the best-known writers to emerge from the former East Germany.  She was sometimes criticized for her failure to be sufficiently critical of the East German regime and for her opposition to German reunification.  Novels like Cassandra, Divided Heaven, and The Quest for Christa T (PT2685 .O36 N313 1972) have garnered her numerous  awards and prizes including the 1963 Heinrich Mann Prize, the 1980 Georg Buchner Prize, and the 1983 Schiller Memorial Prize.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

Christopher Logue (1926-2011) died on December 2nd at the age of 85.  He was a poet, best-known for his award-winning multi-volume modernization of Homer’s Iliad.  Though he worked on it off and on for over 40 years, he would come nowhere near reworking the entire work.  Books that he published in the series include 1981′s War Music, 1991′s Kings, 1995′s The Husbands, 2003′ All Day Permanent Red, and 2005′s Whitbread Poetry Award-winning Cold Calls.  Examples of his work can be found at his poets.org, Poetry Foundation, and Poetry Archive pages.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

David Montgomery (1927-2011) died on December 2nd at the age of 84.  He was a labor historian, considered one of the most influential in the field.  He was also credited with helping to established the field of “new labor history,” a branch that studied labor more in terms of social history than had been done before.  His best-known book was The Fall of the House of Labor:  the Workplace, the State, and American Labor Activism, 1865-1925, which was a finalist for the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for History.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Russell Hoban (1925-2011) died on December 13th at the age of 86.  He was a prolific writer, known for his series of children’s book starring a young badger named Frances, and for the post-apocalyptic science fiction novel Riddley Walker (PS3558 .O33 R5 1982), winner of the John W. Campbell Memorial award and nominee for the Nebula Award for Best Novel.  The Library owns several of his children’s books:

A Baby Sister for Frances (PZ10.3 .H646 Bab)

A Bargain for Frances (PZ10.3 .H646 Bar)

Bedtime for Frances (PZ7 .H637 Bd 1960)

Best Friends for Frances (PZ10.3 .H646 Bg)

A Birthday for Frances (PZ7 .H637 Bi)

Bread and Jam for Frances (PZ10.3 .H646 Br)

The Little Brute Family (PZ8 .H63 Li)

His New York Time obituary can be found here.

Christopher Hitchens (1949-2011) died on December 15th at the age of 62.  He was a prolific journalist and essayist who became a staple of talk show and lecture circuits.  A renowned polemicist, Hitchens attacked a wide variety of public figures, including Bill Clinton, Henry Kissinger, and Mother Teresa in book length works.  The majority of his critiques shorter opinion pieces, published in magazines such as The Nation, Vanity Fair, Slate, and The Atlantic.  His work won him National Magazine Awards in 2007 and 2011 and was a finalist in 2003, 2005, and 2008.  His book God is not Great was nominated for the 2007 National Book Award.  The Library owns Prepared for the Worst:  Selected Essays and Minority Reports (E876 .H58 1988).  The site Daily Hitchens provides links to many of his articles and columns as well as many of his talk show appearances.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Vaclav Havel (1936-2011) died on December 18th at the age of 75.  Before becoming the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first President of the Czech Republic, he was a dissident poet, essayist, and playwright.  His plays, including The Garden Party and The Memorandum, and essays led to his work being banned in Communist-controlled Czechoslovakia.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Simms Taback (1932-2011) died on December 25th at the age of 79.  He was an award-winning author and illustrator of children’s books.  He was best known for Joseph Had a Little Raincoat, winner of the 2000 Caldecott Medal and There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly, a 1998 Caldecott Honor book.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Josef Skvorecky (1924-2012) died on January 3rd at the age of 87.  He was a writer and publisher who fled to Canada following the Soviet invasion of his native Czechoslovakia.  He was a contemporary of other dissident Czech writers such as Milan Kundera, Jaroslav Seifert, and Vaclav Havel, many of whom he published at 68 Publishers, a publishing house he and his wife founded in Toronto in 1971.  For publishing these banned Czech and Slovak writers, President Vaclav Havel awarded him the Order of the White Lion, the highest order of the Czech Republic, in 1990.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Reginald Hill (1936-2012) died on January 12th at the age of 75.  He was an English crime novelist, best known for his series of 24 novels about Yorkshire detectives Andrew Dalziel and Peter Pascoe.  The 11th novel in the series, Bones and Silence, won the 1990 Golden Dagger for best novel of the year from the Crime Writers’ Association.  In 1995 the organization awarded him the Cartier Diamond Dagger for lifetime achievement.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

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Notable Literary Deaths (November 2011)

Robert A. Scalapino (1919-2011) died on November 1st at the age of 92.  He was a scholar of Asian politics, so well-respected, that the National Bureau of Asian Research and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars created the Scalapino Prize in 2010 to honor outstanding scholars in the field of Asian studies.  An author of numerous books about Vietnam, China, Korea, Japan, and Taiwan, including Parties and Politics in Contemporary Japan (JQ1698 .A1 S37) and The Japanese Communist Movement, 1920-1966 (JQ1698 .K9 S27), he rose to prominence as a defender of the United States policy during the Vietnam War.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Michael Hastings (1937-2011) died on November 19th at the age of 74.  He was  a British playwright, best known for his 1984 play Tom & Viv.  The play, which Hastings later helped adapt into a critically acclaimed film, told the fictionalized story of writer T.S. Eliot and his wife Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot.  The play created a controversy over the fictionalizing of the lives of real people.  His New York Times and playbill.com obituaries can be found here and here respectively.

Ruth Stone (1915-2011) died on November 19th at the age of 96.  She was an award-winning poet and creative writing teacher.  Among the awards she won were the 2002 National Book Award for Poetry for In the Next Galaxy, the 2002 Wallace Stevens Award, the 1999 National Book Critics Circle Award for Ordinary Words, and the 1965 Shelley Memorial Award.  Her 2009 collection, What Love Comes to:  New and Selected Poems was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry.  Biographies, criticism, and examples of her work can be found at the Poetry Foundation and poetry.org sites.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

Shelagh Delaney (1938-2011) died on November 20th at the age of 72.  She was a British playwright, best-known for her debut work, A Taste of Honey, a play she wrote as a teenager.  While she wrote several other plays including The Lion in Love (PR6007 .E327 L5 1961), none of them ever garnered the praise that her debut did.  Her New York Times and playbill.com obituaries can be found here and here, respectively.

Anne McCaffrey (1926-2011) died on November 21st at the age of 85.  She was an award-winning American-born Irish fantasy and science fiction author, best known for her Dragonriders of Pern series.  The series, started in 1967, spans 22 novels and a number of short stories.  Beginning in 2003, McAffrey’s son Todd began writing the series, sometimes as a solo author, sometimes as a co-author with his mother.  Works from the series have won or been finalists for the most prestigious awards in the genre.  “Dragonrider” won the 1969 Nebula Award for Best Novella from the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America.  “Weyr Search” won the 1968 Hugo Award for Best Novella from the World Science Fiction Society and “Dramatic Mission” was a finalist for the same award in 1970.  Five novels from the series were finalists for Best Novel, Dragonquest in 1972, The White Dragon in 1979, Moreta:  Dragonlady of Pern in 1984, and All the Weyrs of Pern in 1992.  Additionally, in 2004 McCaffrey was named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, and in 2006 was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame.  Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

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Notable Literary Deaths (October 2011)

Charles Hamm (1925-2011) died on October 16th at the age of 86.  He was one of the first historians to seriously study the field of American popular music.  In books such as Contemporary Music and Music Cultures (ML197 .H245 C6) and Yesterdays:  Popular Song in America (ML3561 .P6 H35) he studied the history and cultural impact of contemporary music often frowned upon by his fellow musicologists.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

John Morton Blum (1921-2011) died on October 17th at the age of 90.  He was a historian who helped pioneer the study of the 20th century American presidency.  His biography, The Republican Roosevelt (E757 .B58 1962), was vital in establishing Theodore Roosevelt’s reputation as a great president.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Ruby Cohn (1922-2011) died on October 18th at the age of 89.  She was a scholar who,  after seeing a performance of the play “Waiting for Godot” by a then unknown Samuel Beckett, became a leading authority on the playwright’s work.  The Library owns several titles that she either wrote or edited:

Casebook on Waiting for Godot (PQ2603 .E378 E63)

Currents in Contemporary Drama (PN1861 .C6 1969)

Dialogue in American Drama (PS351 .C6 1971)

Edward Albee (PS3551 .L25 Z6)

Samuel Beckett:  the Comic Gamut (PR6003 .E282 Z62)

Her New York Times obituary can be found here.

James Hillman (1926-2011) died on October 27th at the age of 85.  He was a psychologist, best-selling author, and popular lecturer who was influential in the field of archetypal psychology.  He is perhaps best-known for 1964′s Suicide and the Soul (RC506 .H5 1973) and 1975′s Re-Visioning Psychology, which garnered him a Pulitzer Prize nomination.  The Library owns several more of his books:  The Myth of Analysis:  Three Essays in Archetypal Psychology (BF173 .J85 H53) and The Soul’s Code:  In Search of Character and Calling (BF697 .H46 1996).  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

Allen Mandelbaum (1926-2011) died on October 27th at the age of 85.  He was a poet, translator, and professor of Italian literature.  He was best known for his translation of works by Italian poets such as Salvatore Quasimodo (Selected Writings (PQ4837 .U3 A25)) and for his translations of Dante Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy and Virgil’s Aeneid, for which he won the 1973 National Book Award for Translation.  His New York Times obituary can be found here.

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